1. El concepto de double-time feel

1.1 Time Change

time_change

Normal time. The standard time feel (4/4 or “four-feel”), or the return to the original time feel after some change.

Double-time. A true doubling of the tempo. A piece (…) taken at double-time (…) would take half the time.

Paul E. Rinzler (1999): Jazz Arranging and Performance Practice: A Guide for Small Ensembles (The Scarecrow Press, Inc.)

1.2 Time feel

time_feel

Feel. In general, the manner of rhythmic interpretation. Specifically, a rhythmic approach that gives the illusion of an actual tempo change; sometimes used as synonym for style.

Double-time feel. The illusion that the tempo is twice as fast as it actually is achieved by using the eighth note rather than the quarter note as the pulse.

Half-time feel. The illusion that the tempo is twice as slow as it actually is achieved by using the half note rather than the quarter note as the pulse.

Paul E. Rinzler (1999): Jazz Arranging and Performance Practice: A Guide for Small Ensembles (The Scarecrow Press, Inc.)

1.3 Distinción entre ambos

time_change_feel

Paul E. Rinzler (1999): Jazz Arranging and Performance Practice: A Guide for Small Ensembles (The Scarecrow Press, Inc.)

1.4 Distinción del time feel en el jazz y en el rock

My hypothesis is that swing rhythm, which is pervasive in several major styles of jazz, not only facilitates the use of double-time feel but allows for subtle gradations in its use. I will offer a model that classifies rhythms according to how strongly they support (or undermine) a double-time feel in a swing rhythm context.

I consider harmonic rhythm to be a stronger tempo indicator than surface rhythm for two reasons: first, because it operates at a deeper, larger-scale level of the music, and second, because it can be related back to the original score that is the basis for the improvisation, when such a score exists.

Matthew J. Voglewede (2013): Toward a Perceptual-Cognitive Account of Double-Time Feel un Jazz (Thesis Presented to the School of Music and Dance and the Graduate School of the University of Oregon in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts).

2. “My funny Valentine” de Richard Rodgers (1933)

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